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Loon Panel Restoration 2017

A client from Rimbey Alberta brought us this panel which if memory serves us correctly had been knocked off the window by her cat. When doing restorations like this we first do a rub by laying over the panel a taped down piece of white freezer paper. We then take carbon copy paper and rub the entire panel which traces the solder lines to the paper and that paper then serves as a guide to rebuild and restore the panel.

This panel was originally made by our clients daughter and we wanted to save as much as possible of her work when restoring this stained glass loon panel.

Then we removed the frame and proceeded to remove the necessary pieces of broken and other glass. In this case we worked from the bottom up and did not proceed beyond the dark blue glass below the brown colored glass as all from there to the top of the panel was still intact.

Fortunately we had matching replacement Spectrum Glass to replace the broken pieces.

The next photo shows the rebuilding process. We had to use quite a lot of new glass in the lower half due to the breakage and to restore proper fitting of the pieces.

When one does this without taking the whole panel apart, it is necessary to first solder together all of the new pieces, then placing some thin clear glass under the restored part in order to bring it up to the same level as the original top portion of the panel. This is required to ensure that new pieces connect properly at the same level. At the request of our client we changed the loon eye to red.

We also installed a 1/2 inch new zinc came frame around the panel.

After soldering we clean the flux off with Kwik Clean, take steel wool (#0000 – which does not scratch glass) to the solder seams. Then apply black patina, again cleaning with Kwik Clean and finally applying Clarity (Kem Pro) stained glass polish.

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Ancient mining ops buildings found in Egypt by a US-Egyptian mission in Aswan

The ruins of two buildings used to supervise mines in ancient Egypt more than 4,400 years ago have been discovered in the south, the antiquities ministry said on Thursday. The find was made by a US-Egyptian mission in the Tal Edfu area north of the city of Aswan. One building was from the era of the pharaoh Djedkare Isesi of the fifth dynasty which ruled Egypt more than 4,400 years ago, the ministry said. The other was constructed during the sixth dynasty which ruled between 2,323 BC and 2,135 BC. “The complex consists of two massive buildings containing many rooms and it is yet to be fully examined,” the antiquities ministry’s Ayman Ashmawy told AFP. “These buildings were used as administrative buildings for the mining teams which would head to the eastern desert to search for gold, copper and precious stones.”

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Japanese tycoon Yusaku Maezawa loans Basquiat masterpiece to Brooklyn Museum

A Basquiat masterpiece, bought by a Japanese billionaire for a record $110.5 million, will make its museum debut this month, going on display in the artist’s home borough of Brooklyn. Jean-Michel Basquiat’s 1982 “Untitled” has been virtually unseen in public and never previously been exhibited in a museum. It depicts a skull-like head in oil-stick, acrylic and spray paint, and was bought at Sotheby’s last May by Yusaku Maezawa. The $110.5 million price tag set a new auction record for Basquiat and a record for the work of any US artist at auction. “My wish to share this masterpiece with as many people as possible begins in Basquiat’s home town of Brooklyn,” Maezawa wrote on his Instagram account Thursday.

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